Font Size: AAA // Print // Bookmark

Trading Organizations - Designated Contract Markets (DCM)

Search Designated Contract Markets (DCM) using the following criteria:

Status:
Date From: Open Calendar To: Open Calendar
Your query is: [Status: ALL] AND [Date From: To: ]
The results for the query dated : 7/30/2014 7:04:52 AM are:

OrganizationStatusDateRemarksAssociated Documents
American Commodity ExchangeVacated as of07/03/1981 American Commodity Exchange (ACE) was founded in 1978 and traded futures on GNMA certificates and US Treasury instruments. The last futures trades were in July 1981. The exchange closed in 1981 under an agreement whereby ACE members were offered membership in the New York Futures Exchange (NYFE).2
AMEX Commodities CorporationDormant as of01/01/2004The AMEX Commodities Corporation (ACC) was designated as a contract market on February 15, 1985. ACC currently is not operational; there has been no activity on the ACC since 1986. 0
Baltimore Chamber of CommerceVacated as of08/18/1936No futures contracts are known to have been traded on the Baltimore Chamber of Commerce after designation. Originally Designated on 8/15/1923, Vacated on 8/18/1936.2
Cantor Exchange, LLCWithdrawn as of11/20/2008On January 26, 2006, the Cantor Exchange (Cantor) requested a stay of the 180 day review period set forth in Section 6 of the Commodity Exchange Act.7
Cantor Financial Futures ExchangeDormant as of01/01/2004The Cantor Financial Futures Exchange (CFFE) is curently dormant. CFFE was a joint venture of the New York Board of Trade and Cantor Fitzgerald & Co, which provided a proprietary electronic trading platform.0
Cantor Futures Exchange, L.P.Designated as of04/20/2010Cantor Futures Exchange, L.P. intends to list a Domestic Movie Box Office Receipt contract as its first contract.24
CBOE Futures Exchange, LLCDesignated as of08/07/2003CBOE Futures Exchange (CFE) is a subsidiary of the Chicago Board Options Exchange (CBOE).2
Chicago Board of Trade (Board of Trade of the City of Chicago, Inc.)Designated as of12/21/2000On 7/12/07, the Chicago Board of Trade (CBOT) became a subsidiary of CME Group Inc. CBOT was originally organized as a grain cash market in 1848; the CBOT is generally considered to be the oldest organized futures exchange. While experts disagree about the exact date when "true" futures trading began, CBOT cash contracts evolved into what are now considered futures contracts. Shortly before the civil war, traders at the CBOT began trading "to-arrive" or forward contracts in agricultural commodities including wheat, corn, and oats. In 1859, the CBOT was granted a charter by the Illinois legislature which, among other things, standardized grades and provided for inspectors of grain to be appointed by the CBOT, whose decisions were binding on members. In 1865, formal trading rules were instituted particularly concerning margin and delivery procedures. In 1877 the CBOT began publishing futures prices, and in 1883 the first clearing organization was established to clear CBOT contracts, initially on a voluntary basis. Under a clearing service agreement between CBOT and CME, most clearing functions for CBOT contracts are performed by CME.1
Chicago Climate Futures Exchange, LLCDesignated as of11/09/2004The Chicago Climate Futures Exchange (CCFE) is wholly owned by Chicago Climate Exchange Inc (CCX). CCX previously filed a notice with the Commission to operate as an exempt commercial market (ECM). CCS announced plans to wind down operations in August of 2011. Effective as of February 28, 2012 there is no remaining open interest in contracts at CCFE and all contracts have been delisted.1
Chicago Mercantile Exchange, Inc.Designated as of12/21/2000The Chicago Mercantile Exchange (CME) was originally known as the Chicago Butter and Egg Board, which was formed in 1898. It became the CME in 1919, trading futures on a variety of agricultural products. On 7/12/07, CME and the Chicago Board of Trade mergered, both becoming subsidiaries of CME Group Inc.1
Page: 1 of 6 [Results 1 - 10] of 56
Next>>>